cracked

cracked:

Let’s say that the person you love the most has just been shot. He or she is lying in the street, bleeding and screaming. A guy rushes up and says, “Step aside.” He looks over your loved one’s bullet wound and pulls out a pocket knife — he’s going to operate right there in the street.

You ask,…

Good for thought

theatlantic
theatlantic:

The Two Torontos

Toronto has hit the big time. I mean, when Ron Burgundy sings Loverboy’s “Working for the Weekend” on Conan in honor of Mayor Rob Ford, let’s just say T-dot is on the map. Sure, it’s for all the wrong reasons. But a shoutout on late-night American television can’t be ignored by the Canadian masses. My Facebook news feed runneth over.
Anyone who’s spent six minutes watching TV or browsing the Internet in the last few weeks has come across the Toronto mayor’s train wreck of a life: the admission to smoking crack; the invocation of a “drunken stupor” as an excuse for being high; the not having oral sex with a woman because he has “more than enough to eat at home”; his litany of apologetic non-apologies; and his national TV show with his doppelganger brother that lasted all of one episode. Now you can even hire a devil-worshiping comedy troupe in Toronto to take you on a bus tour of the most notorious sites in the crack-smoking scandal.
It would all be hilarious if it wasn’t so unseemly. And serious. There are ongoing allegations of domestic abuse and violence. The mayor appears to have an addiction problem. He also let a crack addict share a ride with his children while he himself was “out of it.” How often does that happen? Are those kids safe?
There’s been much handwringing about how Toronto got here. How did a city that’s one of the most diverse in the world end up with a mayor who makes both racist and homophobic comments? How did multicultural Toronto end up with a mayor who seems to revel in his lack of culture? How has Ford’s approval rating remained virtually unscathed, at 42 percent, as the scandal has metastasized?
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Aaron Harris]


Because we have a morbid love if train wrecks especially if the mangled bodies left in the wake aren’t ours.

theatlantic:

The Two Torontos

Toronto has hit the big time. I mean, when Ron Burgundy sings Loverboy’s “Working for the Weekend” on Conan in honor of Mayor Rob Ford, let’s just say T-dot is on the map. Sure, it’s for all the wrong reasons. But a shoutout on late-night American television can’t be ignored by the Canadian masses. My Facebook news feed runneth over.

Anyone who’s spent six minutes watching TV or browsing the Internet in the last few weeks has come across the Toronto mayor’s train wreck of a life: the admission to smoking crack; the invocation of a “drunken stupor” as an excuse for being high; the not having oral sex with a woman because he has “more than enough to eat at home”; his litany of apologetic non-apologies; and his national TV show with his doppelganger brother that lasted all of one episode. Now you can even hire a devil-worshiping comedy troupe in Toronto to take you on a bus tour of the most notorious sites in the crack-smoking scandal.

It would all be hilarious if it wasn’t so unseemly. And serious. There are ongoing allegations of domestic abuse and violence. The mayor appears to have an addiction problem. He also let a crack addict share a ride with his children while he himself was “out of it.” How often does that happen? Are those kids safe?

There’s been much handwringing about how Toronto got here. How did a city that’s one of the most diverse in the world end up with a mayor who makes both racist and homophobic comments? How did multicultural Toronto end up with a mayor who seems to revel in his lack of culture? How has Ford’s approval rating remained virtually unscathed, at 42 percent, as the scandal has metastasized?

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Aaron Harris]

Because we have a morbid love if train wrecks especially if the mangled bodies left in the wake aren’t ours.

thecorcorangroup10amspecial

thecorcorangroup10amspecial:

October 31, 2013 – Central Park West Penthouse Perfection

50 Central Park West, Apt. PHB
Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York
$48,000,000 | 5 Bedrooms | 6 Bathrooms | Approx. 5,600 sq. ft.

Penthouse Perfection on the Park - this spectacular 12-room penthouse with breathtaking views has two terraces and 50 feet fronting Central Park.  

For more information about today’s 10am Special, please visit corcoran.com.

I have three homeless families who would LOVE a place like this!!!! Can the owner write it off as a donation?

theatlantic
theatlantic:

Social Connection Makes a Better Brain

Matt Lieberman, a distinguished social psychologist and neuroscientist, basically won the lottery. This past summer, he was offered three million dollars for an academic position—one million in raw income and two to do lab research. That’s a king’s ransom for a psychology professor. On average, psychology professors make less than six figures and rely on a patchwork of modest grants to sustain their research. All Lieberman had to do was spend four months this year and next year in Moscow, a nice enough city, doing some research—which he would have done anyway at home at UCLA.
But there was a catch. He would have to be away from his wife Naomi and seven-year-old son Ian for those eight months. They could not join him in Moscow. He had a basic trade-off problem, one that kept him up for many nights: Should I take the money and give up those eight months with my family or should I stay home and give up the money and research opportunities? In one form or another, we’ve all faced this dilemma, if on a more modest scale. Do you work late tonight or join your family for dinner? Do you go to the conference or to your friend’s wedding? Do you prioritize your career or your relationships?
Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]


This is status quo for most military families. Skype, FaceBook have become essential in communication!

theatlantic:

Social Connection Makes a Better Brain

Matt Lieberman, a distinguished social psychologist and neuroscientist, basically won the lottery. This past summer, he was offered three million dollars for an academic position—one million in raw income and two to do lab research. That’s a king’s ransom for a psychology professor. On average, psychology professors make less than six figures and rely on a patchwork of modest grants to sustain their research. All Lieberman had to do was spend four months this year and next year in Moscow, a nice enough city, doing some research—which he would have done anyway at home at UCLA.

But there was a catch. He would have to be away from his wife Naomi and seven-year-old son Ian for those eight months. They could not join him in Moscow. He had a basic trade-off problem, one that kept him up for many nights: Should I take the money and give up those eight months with my family or should I stay home and give up the money and research opportunities? In one form or another, we’ve all faced this dilemma, if on a more modest scale. Do you work late tonight or join your family for dinner? Do you go to the conference or to your friend’s wedding? Do you prioritize your career or your relationships?

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

This is status quo for most military families. Skype, FaceBook have become essential in communication!

theatlantic
theatlantic:

On National Coming Out Day, Don’t Disparage the Closet

It has been over five years since I logged onto Facebook and publicly announced my sexual orientation. “I can no longer stay silent, friends,” I wrote. “I am gay and have been for a lifetime. I recognize that this may be a shock to some of you but I would be remiss to only share half of me.” Coming out was both liberating and constricting, for me. It was beautiful although the consequences were occasionally ugly. I am glad I came out. But what about those people who aren’t? 
In October 1988, National Coming Out Day (NCOD) was founded to celebrate individuals who publicly identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender. This October 11 will again be a day cheering authenticity and bravery. And it’s an event I have mixed feelings about.
On the one hand, it takes courage to publicly identify as LGBT. Who wouldn’t commend individuals who openly share their internal selves with the external world knowing they can receive backlash? But while I, too, applaud the authenticity inherent in the act of coming out, the experience is not for everyone. The danger in over-emphasizing coming out is that the act, at least in the short term, benefits the group sometimes more than the individual.
Read more. [Image: Jonathan Erst/Reuters]


Happy Day Of Liberation!!! It gets better!

theatlantic:

On National Coming Out Day, Don’t Disparage the Closet

It has been over five years since I logged onto Facebook and publicly announced my sexual orientation. “I can no longer stay silent, friends,” I wrote. “I am gay and have been for a lifetime. I recognize that this may be a shock to some of you but I would be remiss to only share half of me.” Coming out was both liberating and constricting, for me. It was beautiful although the consequences were occasionally ugly. I am glad I came out. But what about those people who aren’t? 

In October 1988, National Coming Out Day (NCOD) was founded to celebrate individuals who publicly identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender. This October 11 will again be a day cheering authenticity and bravery. And it’s an event I have mixed feelings about.

On the one hand, it takes courage to publicly identify as LGBT. Who wouldn’t commend individuals who openly share their internal selves with the external world knowing they can receive backlash? But while I, too, applaud the authenticity inherent in the act of coming out, the experience is not for everyone. The danger in over-emphasizing coming out is that the act, at least in the short term, benefits the group sometimes more than the individual.

Read more. [Image: Jonathan Erst/Reuters]

Happy Day Of Liberation!!! It gets better!

howstuffworks
howstuffworks:

How Designer Children Work
With the news of 23andMe getting a patent for their Family Traits Inheritance Calculator last week, which they use as part of their genetics-assessment services, the internet is abuzz with speculations about “designer babies’ once again. 
When doctors first performed in vitro fertilization (IVF) in 1978, it gave many otherwise infertile couples a way to have a child of their own. IVF works by removing the eggs from the woman’s uterus, fertilizing them in a laboratory and then, a few days later, transferring the fertilized egg, called a zygote, back into the uterus. IVF has also led to a procedure that allows parents to weed out genetically defective embryos. This procedure is called preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD).
PGD is often used during IVF to test an embryo for genetic disorders before inserting it into the woman’s uterus. Once the egg is fertilized, a cell from each embryo is taken and examined under a microscope for signs of genetic disorders. Many couples use this procedure if there are any inherited disorders in their genes to decrease the possibility that the disorder will passed to their child. Currently, PGD can be used to detect many disorders, including cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease and hemophilia A.
Some genetic disorders are specific to one gender or another, such as hemophilia, which usually affects boys. Doctors may examine the cells to determine the gender of the embryo. In a case where a family has a history of hemophilia, only female embryos are selected for placement in the uterus. This practice is at the center of a larger debate about whether parents should be able to choose embryos purely on the basis of gender. Some people worry that it could lead to an imbalance between genders in the general population, especially in societies that favor boys over girls, such as China.
While PGD enables us to pick out embryos that don’t have genetic disorders, and even chose the gender we want, it is only the beginning of what genetic engineering can do. Parents could some day custom-order babies with certain traits.
For the 23andMe Family Traits Inheritance Calculator, clients send in saliva samples and receive back a report on the different traits and conditions their children might inherit. 23andMe describes the tool as “a fun way to look at such things as what eye color their child might have or if their child will be able to perceive bitter taste or be lactose intolerant.”
Hair- and eye-color selection is already a (highly controversial) possibility. Will designing children to look, act and think a certain way become a commonplace approach to propagation?
Read more… 

The words “designer children” says it all. Do you look at kids who are autistic or have Downs Syndrome & explain people like them will soon be factored out of the population?

howstuffworks:

How Designer Children Work

With the news of 23andMe getting a patent for their Family Traits Inheritance Calculator last week, which they use as part of their genetics-assessment services, the internet is abuzz with speculations about “designer babies’ once again. 

When doctors first performed in vitro fertilization (IVF) in 1978, it gave many otherwise infertile couples a way to have a child of their own. IVF works by removing the eggs from the woman’s uterus, fertilizing them in a laboratory and then, a few days later, transferring the fertilized egg, called a zygote, back into the uterus. IVF has also led to a procedure that allows parents to weed out genetically defective embryos. This procedure is called preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD).

PGD is often used during IVF to test an embryo for genetic disorders before inserting it into the woman’s uterus. Once the egg is fertilized, a cell from each embryo is taken and examined under a microscope for signs of genetic disorders. Many couples use this procedure if there are any inherited disorders in their genes to decrease the possibility that the disorder will passed to their child. Currently, PGD can be used to detect many disorders, including cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease and hemophilia A.

Some genetic disorders are specific to one gender or another, such as hemophilia, which usually affects boys. Doctors may examine the cells to determine the gender of the embryo. In a case where a family has a history of hemophilia, only female embryos are selected for placement in the uterus. This practice is at the center of a larger debate about whether parents should be able to choose embryos purely on the basis of gender. Some people worry that it could lead to an imbalance between genders in the general population, especially in societies that favor boys over girls, such as China.

While PGD enables us to pick out embryos that don’t have genetic disorders, and even chose the gender we want, it is only the beginning of what genetic engineering can do. Parents could some day custom-order babies with certain traits.

For the 23andMe Family Traits Inheritance Calculator, clients send in saliva samples and receive back a report on the different traits and conditions their children might inherit. 23andMe describes the tool as “a fun way to look at such things as what eye color their child might have or if their child will be able to perceive bitter taste or be lactose intolerant.”

Hair- and eye-color selection is already a (highly controversial) possibility. Will designing children to look, act and think a certain way become a commonplace approach to propagation?

Read more… 

The words “designer children” says it all. Do you look at kids who are autistic or have Downs Syndrome & explain people like them will soon be factored out of the population?